First Lady Visits Sarah Moore Greene On National Tour

First Lady Visits Sarah Moore Greene On National Tour

First Lady Dr. Jill Biden speaks with Sarah Moore Greene Magnet Academy principal Robin Curry during a school visit on Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona also met with students and teachers during the visit.

Students and teachers at Sarah Moore Greene Magnet Academy experienced a once-in-a-lifetime event on Monday as they welcomed First Lady Dr. Jill Biden and U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona as part of their national tour of schools.

Biden and Cardona, alongside Principal Robin Curry, visited the classroom of second-year teacher Kaitlyn Baker to meet students.

“When the press came in, all the students went silent,” Baker said, laughing. “But then the First Lady came in, and she really filled the space in the room and was building relationships with the students.”

Principal Curry said classroom visits are a natural part of a typical student learning walk.

“It was just awesome to be able to let her see our kids working hard and our teachers work on foundational literacy,” Curry said.

Biden also spoke with teachers in a small roundtable about educational support.

Farragut Intermediate special education teaching assistant Karol Harper discussed her experience entering the field through Tennessee’s unique Grow Your Own initiative, the state’s apprenticeship plan for preparing professionals transitioning into teaching positions.

The program was a major focus during Biden’s visit to the University of Tennessee later that day.

But the classroom visit and roundtable weren’t the only items on the agenda at Sarah Moore Greene. Biden and Curry had a surprise in store for the staff. Together, they unveiled a renovated lounge space featuring a calming color palette and comfortable furniture.

“I’m just grateful,” educational assistant Rachel Rodgers said. “To be able to go somewhere and sit and recharge and to enjoy your lunch. It’s a blessing to be able to have that.”

The new space has also helped to build community between teachers.

“Before, third grade teachers would sit with third grade. Fourth grade would sit with fourth grade,” Baker said. “But I’ve gotten to talk with other teachers too because we have a common space for when we don’t have students with us.”

All in all, Principal Curry hopes this visit inspires a long-lasting change in the community.

“I’m just hoping that we continue to focus on the great things that our community has, with our school being one of them,” Curry said.

The First Lady and Secretary of Education continued their tour with stops in North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey.

College Application Month Provides Support For Seniors

College Application Month Provides Support For Seniors

As many Knox County students begin their senior year, they are also faced with a question: What will they do after graduation?

The district’s college and career counselors are helping to guide these seniors with College Application and Exploration Month, a statewide event that aims to generate excitement and provide education about the college application process.

“Our goal is to motivate students pursuing a college education, particularly those students that may be first-generation or low-income,” said Gibbs High School college and career counselor Lisa Marie Brown.

Many universities across the state offer application fee waivers during September as part of the initiative, and KCS high schools have organized several events throughout the month for their students.

Gibbs High School is hosting a Senior Family Night for students to meet with campus representatives from various institutions to learn about their programs. School counselors will also be set up during lunches to help answer application questions.

“My hope for our college-going students is that they challenge themselves and use every resource available to them to learn, grow, and become successful,” Brown said.

Hardin Valley Academy senior Megan McElroy looks forward to meeting with different colleges this month to find the perfect fit for her.

“I’m planning to go to a community college for the Tennessee Promise,” she said. “I need [a university] that will take my transfer credits, something that is not super expensive, one that has a community so you feel supported, and they help you after you graduate.”

Seniors across the district will meet with their school counselors to discuss post-graduation plans. For those interested in pursuing a college education, more information on College Application and Exploration Month can be found here.

Central High School Artist Chosen For Frist Exhibition

Central High School Artist Chosen For Frist Exhibition

Trinity Anthony’s painting, Internal Transfixation, was accepted for a show at the Frist Art Museum, in Nashville. (Submitted photo)

A Central High School senior has reached a goal many artists with more experience are still striving to accomplish: having their work displayed in a world-class art museum.

Trinity Anthony sent in four pieces to the Frist Art Museum in Nashville, unsure if even one would be selected for the Young Tennessee Artists exhibition.

“I wasn’t sure if anyone liked it,” she said about her piece entitled Internal Transfixation, which was selected for the show. Anthony said that because of COVID, she wasn’t able to get much feedback about the painting before submitting it to the Frist: “I was really surprised when it got in because no one was really able to comment on it.”

The piece is one of her favorites, she said, inspired by a previous traumatic accident that kept her away from her school and friends for half a year. Nearly six years ago, Anthony suffered a severe concussion after a fall.

“I was just stuck in my room for six months with nothing,” Anthony said of her recovery. “I couldn’t watch TV. I couldn’t read because the words just hurt. I had to have lights off all the time.”

It was then, in the darkness of her bedroom, alone, that she picked up drawing.

“I was able to draw things around me,” she said. “That was my only outlet to express myself and how I felt.”

When she was eventually cleared for 15 minutes of screen time per day, she utilized those periods by watching art videos and documentaries of artists to learn their techniques and improve her own skill.

“Once I got through all that, it really just blossomed,” Anthony said. “It’s an obsession.”

She has since had her work displayed in several art shows across her community, including the Knoxville Museum of Art East Tennessee Regional Student Art Exhibit, the Tennessee Valley Fair Art Show, and two Central High School art shows.

The young artist not only excels in her creativity and artistry, but also in academics and extracurriculars.

At Central High School, she is a member of the National Honor Society, was in the Science Club, created the Book Club, is the president of the Art Club, takes AP courses, and is studying for the ACT.

In her community, Anthony is a member of the National Art Honor Society, is on the Knox County Library Teen Advisory Board, completed an internship with The Bottom community center, worked as an apprentice at Beardsley Community Farm, and has been invited to be a part of a new arts collective in Knoxville.

Amanda Cagle, Anthony’s 7th-grade principal at South Doyle Middle School and now an assistant principal at Central, says Anthony “surpassed my thoughts of what you could do at that age.”

When reflecting on her success and growth as a young person, she said, “It feels very surreal, and it feels like an out-of-body experience. But it’s all very exciting.”

Anthony’s work will be displayed in the Frist Museum at the Conte Community Arts Gallery from Sept. 2, 2022 through Feb. 12, 2023.